How US GSA Auto Auctions Work

How US GSA Auto Auctions Work

The United States General Services Administration (US GSA) is an agency of the US government that provides transportation to federal employees among other things. Under the GSA is the GSA Fleet Vehicle Sales. This division is responsible for auctioning off government-owned vehicles to the public.
Annually, the GSA Fleet Vehicle Sales put up thousands of vehicles for auction. Some of these vehicles include SUVs, trucks and cars. People can join these auctions so long as they are at least 18 years of age and have a driver’s license. Employees of the GSA, however, are barred from joining a GSA auction as well as the members of their immediate families.
Joining GSA auctions is easy. The thing that the bidder has to do is be present during the day of the auction. On that day, the bidder will also have to register prior to the actual auction. Bidders will not be charged for any fee to join the auction.
The conditions of the vehicles being auctioned off by the GSA are in good condition. These vehicles are carefully maintained by the GSA and have low mileage. Bidders can be confident about the condition of every vehicle because it is carefully detailed before it gets auctioned off.
But if bidders wish to be extra sure of the car’s condition, they can inspect the vehicle before the auction. They can start the engine and check other accessories such as the air conditioning, engine and others. They cannot, however, take the car out for a test drive.
As for the price, buyers can typically buy vehicles at prices lower than those sold at dealerships. One reason behind this is that the winning bidders are not asked for any buyer’s fee for the vehicle unlike other auto auctions.
There are several payment options for winning bidders to pay for the vehicles they win. The quickest option would be on a cash basis. But aside from cash, the GSA also accepts credit card, some types of checks and money orders.
Bidders must make sure that their chosen payment option is valid to prevent hitches after the auction primarily because winning bidders cannot refuse the vehicle after they win. Otherwise, they will be penalized and will be made to pay additional fees. Sometimes, they won’t be allowed to other government auctions until they have settled their bill.
Cedric S. is a writer for www.articles-r-us.net

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